Will the NPP Win the Next Election?

Even if we had accurate political polls, no one would be able to tell you whether the country is set to elect the incumbent president, John Mahama, or if we’ll see Nana Afuko-Addo in power next year. But there are some indications tied into the present state of the Ghanaian problems that are likely to Read more…

The Fifth Democracy in Africa? What Does It Mean?

According to the 2015 World Democracy Report, Ghana sits in fifth place in terms of African democracies. That’s a big leap; Ghana jumped an impressive 14 places from its spot in 2014. But what does it really mean? In the minds of many, that means that only four countries are less corrupt than Ghana. Considering Read more…

Ghana’s Growth Rate Slips (but Not the President’s Wealth?)

Recently, the statistics office released the official 2015 gross domestic product (GDP) figures – and sadly, the growth rate declined over the previous year. Sure, it only slipped from 4 percent to 3.9 percent, but it’s not what anyone wants to hear. According to the governmental department, this decline can be attributed to a reduction Read more…

Where Does the Money Go (and How Do People Get in)?

Corruption is almost expected in developing countries. It’s not that it doesn’t happen elsewhere in the world; it’s just that it’s a little more difficult when the majority of the population achieves a higher level of education. So, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the opposition party has called the current government’s spending on Read more…

What’s Up Is Down (or Is It the Other Way Around?)

Even when things slow in Ghana (as with Dumsor), nothing ever stands still. It’s just not that kind of place. Things are always growing, changing, transforming, shifting, and generally just moving about. And that’s every corner of life, from the cities to the remotest of buildings. And, as the laws of nature confirm, there is Read more…

It’s a Drive to the Future (or Just onto the Field)

Ghana never seems to stand still. Even when people and business battle daily dumsor, nothing seems to stop; it just slows down. And it doesn’t stay like that for long either. At some point, Ghanaians start moving again, and they do it quickly. Last Friday was a clear example of this as Ghana played host Read more…

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